Poultry Inspection Modernization

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has been exploring the modernization of its poultry inspection system for two decades – a system that was originally developed in the 1950s.  USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service in 1997 reported that studies by the National Academy of Sciences, the General Accounting Office and USDA “have established the need for fundamental change in the USDA meat and poultry inspection program.”

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has been exploring the modernization of its poultry inspection system for two decades – a system that was originally developed in the 1950s. USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) in 1997 reported that studies by the National Academy of Sciences, the General Accounting Office and USDA “have established the need for fundamental change in the USDA meat and poultry inspection program.”

A pilot program was put in place in 1997 in 20 chicken plants, called the HACCP-Based Inspection Models Project, or HIMP. The goal of HIMP was to test an alternative food safety inspection system that sought to decrease pathogen contamination in poultry by refocusing FSIS inspector activities from low-value food safety activities such as carcass sorting to high-value food safety activities such as offline food safety verification tasks. It has since been studied, debated and reviewed in depth for almost 20 years to assure its effectiveness as to how best modernize chicken inspection while improving food safety and protecting workers.

 

See What Modernizing Poultry Inspection Looks Like:

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